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PGCert Pastoral Ministry

Course length
  • Not available full-time
  • 1 year part-time
  • An honours degree (normally 2.1 or above) or equivalent in an appropriate subject
Summary

Explore the foundations of pastoral theology to support your pastoral reflection and to help you make an informed contribution to contemporary debates on the points of contact between theology and practice.

This programme is suited for people already in ministry. In addition to theology, you can choose a module in either canon law or contemporary ethics to suit your own pastoral context.


The timetable for 2016-17 can be found in the Postgraduate Options Handbook at the bottom of the page.

Teaching & Assessment

The programme consists of two taught modules (one core plus one optional module). The optional module should be relevant to your pastoral context. Each module usually has 11 weeks of two-hour seminars for one term, except for Spirituality, Religion and Ethics in Contemporary Healthcare which is taught as a four-day intensive programme. There are also optional Open Learning Sessions are held at weekends. Students are assessed by two pieces of coursework and the end of year essay.

Core module

Students take one module in Michalemas term and another in Lent term which allows for completion in less than one academic year.
Foundations of Pastoral Theology

Bring together key theological elements with a reflective approach to Christian ministry.

This module aims to establish foundations for pastoral studies by bringing together key theological elements with a reflective approach to Christian ministry. It will introduce a range of issues in methodology for pastoral theology; ecclesiology in pastoral ecclesiology; Christian ministry; theological reflection.

Optional modules

The Bible in the life of the Church

Examine the Bible as the central religious, spiritual, intellectual and cultural source for faith communities of Judaism and Christianity.

This module examines the Bible as the central religious, spiritual, intellectual and cultural source of communities of faith: Judaism and Christianity in its various denominations. Exegetical analysis of selected Biblical texts will be reflected against the backdrop of their theological, liturgical, artistic and musical reception. Communities of faith will be seen both as the hermeneutical framework for the interpretation of canonical texts as well as inspired and fostered by them. According to specific interests of students, the module will also give an opportunity to improve practical skills regarding the “ministry of the Word”.

Modern Theologies of Liturgy

Study the approaches of modern liturgical theologians to explore the relationship between liturgy and church.

In this module we discuss contemporary understandings of liturgical and especially eucharistic theology, through an ecumenical range of writers, including Casel, Kilmartin, Schmemann, Chauvet, Kavanagh and Irwin.  We also explore the range of cultural influences on liturgy; and by doing this, our liturgical theology

Spirituality, Religion and Ethics in Contemporary Healthcare

Expand your understanding of spiritual, religious and ethical issues which are not normally part of medical formation.

Although broad in its scope, this module offers an academically rigorous and structured reflection on the subject of spirituality and its related themes from the fields of philosophy, theology and ethics. It is designed to enable healthcare professionals and all those interested in the subject to expand their understanding of spiritual, religious and ethical issues which are not normally part of medical formation, and encourages the development of a critical overview of the growing body of literature on this complex field. It explores such concepts as: ‘the human person’, ‘the meaning of life’, ‘care’ and ‘justice’ and examines the bases of (and some difficulties with) of the language of ‘human dignity’, ‘sickness’, ‘health’, ‘stigma’, ‘vulnerability’

Taught as an intensive module. Teaching dates for 2016/17 are yet to be published.

Taught as a four-day intensive
Marriage in Canon Law

Explore the meaning of marriage as a partnership of the whole life, and investigate consent, nullity and the effects of prenuptial agreements on these concepts. You will look at the difference between dissolution of marriage in the Roman Catholic Church and a civil divorce.

Central to this lecture and seminar module will be a consideration of the success or otherwise of attempting to translate the doctrine of Vatican II regarding marriage, into canonical categories. The substantive issue of matrimonial consent will be dealt with in detail, as well as the present law of canonical form. The module will end by examining the procedural law on marriage, particularly with regard to nullity, or invalidity