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Prof Johannes Hoff

Prof Johannes Hoff Lecturer
Telephone: 020 7795 4264

Biography

Johannes Hoff is Professor of Systematic and Philosophical Theology at Heythrop College in the University of London. Prior to that he was Professor of Philosophical Theology at the University of Wales, Lampeter (now TSD University of Wales), and programme director of the MTh in Systematic and Philosophical Theology.

His most recent publications focus on the concepts of ‘analogy’ and ‘performativity’ – the gradual actualisation of the truth whilst speaking and acting. This research builds on his collaboration with representatives of contemporary art ( Simon Njami, Aron Kitzig, Christoph Schlingensief,   Venice Biennale, Bayreuth Festival,  IRWIN/NSK, et al.). In connection with this research, he has started to think about the digital revolution of our time, and to investigate the anthropological foundations of the human way of thinking under the working title “What’s left?” More precisely, this research investigates three question: “What’s left of the emancipatory legacy of modernity?”, “What’s left of the tradition of Christian way of living and learning?” and “What’s left of human intelligence after the modularisation, digitalisation and mechanisation of its specific ‘faculties’?”

Born in the oldest city of Germany, Trier, Johannes received his undergraduate and postgraduate education in philosophy and theology at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn and at the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen. Subsequently he taught more than ten years as research fellow and associate professor at the Faculty of Catholic Theology of the University of Tübingen. He was awarded his Doctorate and Habilitation in during this time, and became a member of the professorial board (PD) of the Universität Tübingen in 2007.

In his earliest publications he engaged with bioethical questions. His first book “Wann ist der Mensch tot?”, together with Jürgen in der Schmitten, was awarded as “Wissenschaftsbuch des Jahres” (Scientific book of the year) in 1994.

His subsequent research specialized on the ‘analogical turn’ of Anglophone theology and philosophy in the wake of Henri de Lubac and Alasdair MacIntyre, the return of apophatic theology in post-modernity, and similar upheaval experiences in the Early Renaissance (15th century) and Early Romanticism (18/19th century). Related to these topics is his research on the sacramental ontologies of Nicholas of Cusa, Meister Eckhart, Thomas Aquinas, Augustine und Dionysius the Areopagite.

Current teaching

Courses in Systematic and Philosophical Theology

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